Trans-four-m!

He squares his shoulders
Walking tall to school in his new shirt of blue
So much like his father
So much his own little man too

The children sit in a row
Reciting their lesson with their teacher on tiled floor
And I catch his face light up aglow
As we sneak him a wink round the frame of the door

It’s a wonderful day for a birthday
All together now, smile for a picture
“How old are you now, God bless you today”
It’s a great month to turn a grand four!

Copyright – iwonderbee.wordpress.com

Bookmark Monday: Old Mother Goose used to fly through the air

First there were the original rhymes, and then came the all-new rhymes recounting the latest adventures of best-loved Mother Goose characters.

And although I have a deep appreciation for the originals, some of the “updated” versions in Mary Had a Little Jam and Other Silly Rhymes, written by Bruce Lansky and illustrated by Stephen Carpenter, are laugh-out-loud funny and preschooler pleasers in their own right.

 

Mary had a little jam;
She spread it on a waffle.
And if she hadn’t eaten ten,
she wouldn’t feel so awful.

Notwithstanding that fullest appreciation of the underlying joke in each rhyme is best supported by knowing the originals to begin with, the collection of short rhymes with fairly easy words makes it an accessible and achievable to beginner readers, and as Christine Clark, editor at Humpty Dumpty’s Magazine put it, it is well and truly “a kinder, gentler Mother Goose…and funny, too!”

I’ll leave you with one more reason why I like this somewhat over the originals, and let you check out the book yourself. 🙂

Rock-a-bye, baby, on the treetop.
When the wind blows, the cradle will rock.
When the birds sing, the baby will smile,
and fall asleep happy in a short while.

Gotta love that over the horrifying original, what kind of baby falls asleep to thoughts of falling out of a tree?

Preschooler Art: The King’s Breakfast

 

The King’s Breakfast

By A. A. Milne 1882–1956, from The Complete Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh (Dutton, 1998).

The King asked
The Queen, and
The Queen asked
The Dairymaid:
“Could we have some butter for
The Royal slice of bread?”
The Queen asked
The Dairymaid,
The Dairymaid
Said, “Certainly,
I’ll go and tell
The cow
Now
Before she goes to bed.”

The Dairymaid
She curtsied,
And went and told
The Alderney:
“Don’t forget the butter for
The Royal slice of bread.”

The Alderney
Said sleepily:
“You’d better tell
His Majesty
That many people nowadays
Like marmalade
Instead.”

The Dairymaid
Said, “Fancy!”
And went to
Her Majesty.
She curtsied to the Queen, and
She turned a little red:
“Excuse me,
Your Majesty,
For taking of
The liberty,
But marmalade is tasty, if
It’s very
Thickly
Spread.”

The Queen said
“Oh!”
And went to
His Majesty:
“Talking of the butter for
The Royal slice of bread,
Many people
Think that
Marmalade
Is nicer.
Would you like to try a little
Marmalade
Instead?”

The King said,
“Bother!”
And then he said,
“Oh, dear me!”
The King sobbed, “Oh, deary me!”
And went back to bed.
“Nobody,”
He whimpered,
“Could call me
A fussy man;
I only want
A little bit
Of butter for
My bread!”

The Queen said,
“There, there!”
And went to
The Dairymaid.
The Dairymaid
Said, “There, there!”
And went to the shed.
The cow said,
“There, there!
I didn’t really
Mean it;
Here’s milk for his porringer
And butter for his bread.”

The Queen took
The butter
And brought it to
His Majesty;
The King said,
“Butter, eh?”
And bounced out of bed.
“Nobody,” he said,
As he kissed her
Tenderly,
“Nobody,” he said,
As he slid down
The banisters,
“Nobody,
My darling,
Could call me
A fussy man—
BUT
I do like a little bit of butter to my bread!”

 

Singapore National Day Craft: Aerial Flypast

Each year, the number of planes and models used for the aerial flypast varies. This year, nine fighter jets will execute the enhanced aerial flypast.

We chose to make five airplanes in our craft to represent the five stars on the Singapore flag, which stand for the nation’s ideals of democracy, peace, progress, justice and equality.

That was the plan. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it. 😛

Okay, fine…

The plain truth is that was all we could wrangle from the kids, the rest they wanted to fly all over the room. Sigh.

But I digress. What I really wanted to say is that this craft allows you the flexibility to make as many planes as you like and arrange them in any formation you choose. 🙂

So –

You will need the following materials: Artblock sheets, blue watercolour paint, paintbrush and palette, water, cotton wool/pads, old magazines, craft glue.

1. In the palette, mix the blue watercolour paint until you achieve a very watery consistency.  This is to create a watery watercolour wash to cover the artblock in light sky blue.

2. Apply the watercolour wash to the entire artblock sheet.  Leave to dry.

3. In the meantime, tear the old magazine sheets into little rectangles, and fold tiny paper airplanes.

4. Paste the paper airplanes in whatever formation you desire, we did this in a fan out formation. (Tip: When you paste the airplanes down, hold it down for a short moment, pinning the centre flap of the paper plane between two fingers, so that the wings don’t spread when drying)

5. Tear up the cotton wool/pads and paste  a cloud trail pattern of your choosing.

And you’re done!

Bookmark Monday: All about Singapore

I had wanted to allocate one Bookmark Monday segment for covering Singapore history and its road to independence. However there aren’t any books (I haven’t found them and I’ve asked the librarians but if you know of any, please drop me a note!) for young readers, and the most elementary that I have found is in the Primary Four level Social Studies syllabus. But that’s for another post…

For this week’s post, as an alternative to the printed page, I thought I would list a couple of events that have been organised in celebration of Singapore’s 47th National Day, that we ourselves are thinking of checking out.

  • TimeOut has published a short article listing four activities for kids in Singapore this month. Click on this link to find out more. Among the listed activities, is free entry to the Istana on 5 August, art and craft activities at the Arts and Heritage Village and complimentary entry into the Istana Building (otherwise priced at $2) if your child participates in the On-the-Spot Art competition.
  • The National Museum of Singapore, in a collaboration with the National Archives of Singapore is displaying an exhibition titled 45-65: Liberation, Unrest…a New Nation at its Stamford Gallery on Level 1.  This is a free admission exhibition running till 18 November.  It’s free, it runs for some time, I don’t have to be asked twice. 🙂
  • And for the entire month of August 2012, the National Heritage Board is offering free entry for Singaporean citizens and permanent residents to the permanent galleries of the following museums – Asian Civilisations Museum, Memories at Old Ford Factory, National Museum of Singapore, Peranakan Museum, Reflections at Bukit Chandu, Singapore Art Museum and Singapore Philatelic Museum.

To all our Singaporean readers, Happy 47th National Day!

Craft with Daddy: Papier mache shark

A project in progress, DH and the kids dipped old newspaper strips in a craft glue solution to make a papier mache mix, which was then moulded around a plastic water bottle to form the shape of the shark.

Currently finished in acrylic paint and awaiting the next free afternoon to work on detailing the sharks’ features.  🙂

Singapore National Day Craft: Fly our flag

I don’t know about you but my favourite segments of the National Day Parade are without a doubt, the fly past and military defence showcase. And with this year’s theme – Salute to 45 Years of National Service in Singapore, I am anticipating an even more impressive show.

Last Saturday evening, I happened to be attending a wedding dinner at the Fullerton Hotel. When I heard the deafening roar of the jet engines as I entered the lift on the first floor, it was all I could do to hurry on to the fifth floor roof garden…only to find that the Fullerton’s roof garden is enclosed. Bummer! So much for hoping to be able to catch a free glimpse.

Anyway.
I found 20 craft sticks in our art bureau, and decided we would do a little “Fly our Flag” craft.

You will need the following materials: 10 plain craft sticks (for each child), craft glue, red and white acrylic paints, brushes and palette, twine or string, toy helicopter.

1. Take 8 craft sticks and line them up in in a single column. Apply craft glue down the left and right hand side of the column, and paste one craft stick on each side perpendicular to the rows. Leave to dry.

2. When dry, paint the top 4 rows with red acrylic paint, and the bottom 4 rows with white. Leave to dry.

3. Paint on a crescent moon and five stars. (We tried this both with a skinny paintbrush and a Q-tip, both seem to work fairly well, very good for testing fine motor dexterity). Again, leave to dry.

4. When dry, using twine or string, tie the flag to the helicopter and you’ll have your own little fly past model ready for when the aerial segment comes on.