Bookmark Monday: Rhyming and repetition

This week, we’re into rhyming and repetition – two very useful techniques to encourage confidence in early readers.

I love the smile on their faces when they recognize a word that sounds like or looks similar to another word used previously in the same sentence, and catch on to the phonic patterns. And from there, we watch their enthusiasm to finish the story reading together with us, fire up like nothing we can ourselves hope to inspire on our own efforts.

Two books we have been enjoying from our local library this week:-

My Cat Likes to Hide in Boxes – written by Eve Sutton and illustrated by Lynley Dodd

A very popular New Zealand children’s book first published in 1974.  Consisting of incremental lines describing cats from other countries and what they do, and then always followed by the phrase, “But my cat likes to hide in boxes.”, the text is humorous and provides lots of laughs while serving double duty in training the eye and ear to rhyme and repetition.  Below is an excerpt as a sampler…

The cat from Norway, got stuck in the doorway

The cat from Spain, flew an aeroplane

The cat from France,  liked to sing and dance

But my cat likes to hide in boxes.

Moose on the Loose – written by Kathy Jo-Wargin and illustrated by John Bendall-Brunello

What would you do with a moose on the loose?

Would you chase him, or race him, or stand up to face him?

What would you do with a moose on the loose?

What would you do with a moose in your yard? Or in your house? How about in your room? Or in your tub?

Would you give him two boats? Would you see if he floats?

If you have some cardboard or index cards on hand, write out each of the rhyming words on a card and have your child read them as you follow the adventures of this cheeky moose on the loose, and pin them up on a word wall. Makes a fantastic way of visually identifying the rhyming patterns in the text of the story.

Enjoy! 😀

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